City of Perpetual Resonance

Tumbls of Alee Karim. Mostly here to look as it seems Tumblr doesn't need my help. I'm more interesting at aleekarim.com

notfadeaway asked: I'm working on a script for a comic I'm creating. My cast is primarily female and I'm worried I have too many women. When you're writing CM (since your cast is largely female) do you ever think, "there should be a guy in here somewhere?" And if so, what do you do? I'm really comfortable writing women, and I love my characters... I see no need for anymore men in the story at this time, but I'm afraid it won't appeal to a large enough audience. 3 prominent women to 1 supporting male? Too much?

wilwheaton:

kellysue:

>too many women

I’m sorry, I don’t know what those words mean in that order. 

>do you ever think, “there should be a guy in here somewhere?”

No. 

>I see no need for anymore men in the story at this time, but I’m afraid it won’t appeal to a large enough audience.

STOP IT. 

You’re trying to sell a thing you haven’t even written yet.  Write the story you would write if you were just going to put it in a drawer.  

Write the story you want to read. 

"You’re trying to sell a thing you haven’t even written yet. Write the story you would write if you were just going to put it in a drawer.

"Write the story you want to read. "

I think that, at some point, all of us who write forget this, and I’m so grateful to Kelly Sue for reminding us.

planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via

A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.

The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.

Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.

Evolution happens like a movie, with frames moving by both quickly and gradually, and we often can’t see the change while it’s occurring. Every time we find a fossil, it’s a snapshot back in time, often with thousands of frames missing in between, and we’re forced to reconstruct the whole film. Life is what happens in between the snapshots. Joe Hanson explores why there was no first human (via explore-blog)

2headedsnake:

Yasuaki Onishi

hot glue art

(Source: onys.net)

70sscifiart:

This would make a good desktop background across multiple monitors… it’s massive.

70sscifiart:

This would make a good desktop background across multiple monitors… it’s massive.

thenewenlightenmentage:

How a Medieval Philosopher Dreamed Up the ‘Multiverse’
The idea that our universe may be just one among many out there has intrigued modern cosmologists for some time. But it looks like this “multiverse” concept might actually have appeared, albeit unintentionally, back in the Middle Ages.
When scientists analyzed a 13th-century Latin text and applied modern mathematics to it, they found hints that the English philosopher who wrote it in 1225 was already toying with concepts similar to the multiverse.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

How a Medieval Philosopher Dreamed Up the ‘Multiverse’

The idea that our universe may be just one among many out there has intrigued modern cosmologists for some time. But it looks like this “multiverse” concept might actually have appeared, albeit unintentionally, back in the Middle Ages.

When scientists analyzed a 13th-century Latin text and applied modern mathematics to it, they found hints that the English philosopher who wrote it in 1225 was already toying with concepts similar to the multiverse.

Continue Reading

(via quantumfawn)

brianmichaelbendis:

David Aja’s Iron Fist

brianmichaelbendis:

David Aja’s Iron Fist

(Source: ungoliantschilde)

artruby:

David Altmejd’s Juices at Andrea Rosen Gallery.